Category Archives: Podcasts

Podcast returning next week!

We are pleased to let you know that the PHU podcast will be starting up again next week! I will be discussing vaccine hesitancy with Drs. Heidi Larson and Pauline Paterson who co-direct the Vaccine Confidence Project via London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (among many other cool things!).

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Dr. Nina in the house!

It’s been a long time since the last podcast, but with good reason: on September 1st, I successfully defended my doctoral thesis in molecular microbiology & immunology. I also have completed two manuscripts for publication over the summer. Other great things I was up to:

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  • Got a job! Starting soon: associate at the International Vaccine Access Center on the Policy, Advocacy, and Communications Team! Learn more about IVAC on this podcast with my new boss Lois. Or listen to Bill “heartthrob” Moss here and here.
  • Fellow, New York Academy of Sciences Science Alliance Leadership Training – July 2017. Five days of leadership training at the Academy. Met so many great people and learned so much about myself, how I function in group settings, and things to work on to become a better leader (and group member).
  • Oral presentation, American Society for Microbiology Conference for Undergraduate Educators – gave a ‘microbrew’ talk on my scicomm course. Fantastic conference in Denver, Colorado with fellow educators interested in improving science teaching methodologies. I can’t wait for next year already! July 26-August 1.
  • Completed Teaching As Research Fellowship: June 2017. Completed this yearlong fellowship that provided training and resources to research the effectiveness of my teaching methods in my course, “Communicating Science.” Presented on June 30 at Johns Hopkins University.
  • Awarded Gordis Teaching Fellowship: Johns Hopkins School of Public Health teaching fellowship to design and teach a course to public health studies undergraduates at Johns Hopkins. Taught self-designed course “Communicating Science: Skills to Analyze and Communicate Science News”. Awarded for three semesters: Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017.
  • Instructor, Introduction to Biomedical Sciences, August 2017. Taught three classes as part of Dr. Gundula Bosch’s intensive summer course for incoming JHSPH graduate students. Sessions taught: Science Communication, Molecular Biology, Musculoskeletal System, Cardiovascular System. This was my fourth year co-teaching this course and always meet so many fantastic new students.
  • Invited speaker, JHSPH Molecular Microbiology & Immunology Postdoc Forum. July 2017. Science Communication.
  • Invited speaker, Mississippi State University, September 2017. The anti-vaccine movement.
  • Completed Johns Hopkins Teaching Academy “Preparing Future Faculty” Certificate Program, Johns Hopkins University, September 2017. This certificate program provides training in teaching methods for Hopkins graduate students and postdocs. Check out here.

Episode 47: Monica Mungier On Talking Parasites

Monica Mugnier

Our latest guest is also the latest faculty addition to the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology at Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Dr. Monica Mugnier (big news: Monica won an 2016 NIH Early Independence Award which allowed her to skip the tradtional postdoctoral fellowship and become faculty right after completing her PhD work). Monica studies a kind of parasite, called a tropanosome, that causes the disease African Sleeping Sickness. They are very difficult to control for a vaiety of reasons, one of them being the focus of her work (and some very cool science) on how they can rapidly change their coats to avoid detection by our immune system (aka antigenic variation). Monica finds these parasites so cool to study because they break all of the rules (read: they don’t follow any of the classic biology rules that she learned in class). Lots of mystery and discovery!

Monica and I have a great conversation on how to make a great science presentation (and how difficult it can be to strike the right amount of info, depending on your audience). We also discuss the challenges of conveying the importance of global health science research, especially when the illness primarily impacts people on a different continent.

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Episode 46: Dean Mike Klag On The Power of Public Health

Mike KlagOur latest guest, Dean Mike Klag, has served at Johns Hopkins School of Public Health for the past decade and has worked to keep the School at the forefront of both international and community health. Dean Klag describes the roots of our school, the largest and oldest school of public health and how, owing to its biomedical roots, it is unique in that it hosts three basic science departments as well as more classic public health fields like international health, epidemiology, policy, biotstats, and mental health.

We also learn about how he got into public health and his major goals and accomplishments as dean. Dean Klag will be stepping down in June 2017.

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Episode 45: AAAS CEO Rush Holt On Science & Politics

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From his earliest days, Dr. Rush Holt has been interested in “how the world works (that’s science) and how people get along (that’s politics).” There are few who want to do both.  Rush is one of the rare scientists who has served in Congress and has integrated ‘science and society’ into everything he’s done. Hear about what it was like to be a scientist in Congress and how scientists should be communicating. Rush is currently the CEO of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) & was the U.S. Representative for New Jersey’s 12 congressional district from 1999 to 2015.

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Episode 44: Ellis Rubinstein, New York Academy of Sciences President

ellis-rubinsteinEllis Rubinstein always knew that he wanted to combine his seemingly distinct passions for reporting news and science. Before stepping into his current role as New York Academy of Sciences’ President, he served as Editor of Science Magazine, the scientific journal of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In our latest podcast, he discusses how important it is for young scientists to be involved in AAAS and NYAS, and to not limit membership and activism to just those in their later careers as some other scientific societies due. Under his watch, the NYAS has the highest number of young scientists (including graduate and more junior students), thanks to the tremendous amount of work Ellis has done to promote career development, networking, and mentoring opportunities.

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Episode 43: Modernizing Science Education with Emily Fisher and Arvin Saleh

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On the latest episode, Nina teams up with her Communicating Science student Arvin Saleh and his advisor Dr. Emily Fisher to talk about the wave that’s been hitting undergraduate campuses with the aim of improving how we teach science. These new strategies, called active learning, are designed to put the learning in the hands of the student and engage in course material. We go into detail about what this is and examples in this podcast. Emily is the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Biology at Johns Hopkins University. Arvin is a junior and double major in Public Health Studies and Cellular and Molecular Biology.

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Episode 42: Meghan Moran On Persuasive Communication

 

meghan-moranOur latest guest, Dr. Meghan Moran, researches how the tobacco industry uses persuasive messaging on youths and teens–and how public health policy makers can use that knowledge to implement prevention campaigns. She also uses her expertise in persuasive communication to analyze why people are swayed by anti-vaccine messaging, and that it is not for the reasons we typically consider! Meghan is an Assistant Professor in Health, Behavior and Society Department at Johns Hopkins School of Public Health.

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Episode 40! Lois Privor-Dumm On Vaccine Policy & Advocacy Communication

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Nina gets to do her favorite thing on the latest episode: talk about vaccines! Nina is back over at the International Vaccine Access Center with Director of Policy and Advocacy Communications Lois Privor-Dumm. Lois has been working on vaccine advocacy for decades to bring life saving vaccines (like the one to prevent meningitis) to countries all over the world.

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Episode 39: Tom Quinn on the HIV/AIDS Epidemic and Global Health

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Special #WorldAidsDay podcast! Our latest guest, Dr. Tom Quinn, was one of the first doctors working on HIV/AIDS here in the US in 1981 and still in the frontlines of combatting this global epidemic as Director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Global Health, Associate Director for International Research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), a researcher at Johns Hopkins University, and a consultant at a long list of places like The U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), World Health Organization (WHO). Truly a champion for public health.

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Episode 37: Andrea Gielen On Injury Prevention & Policy

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For people my own age (let’s loosely say somewhere in your 30’s), unintentional injury is the leading cause of death in the United States! In fact, one person is dying every three minutes from injury…And is thought to cost us around $671 billion per year!

Dr. Andrea Gielen is Director of the Center for Injury Research & Policy at Johns Hopkins and a very passionate person in general about getting the message out about how much injury is costing us each year–and all the many things we can do to help. Injury is a much broader term than Nina had realized and can include anything from falling down the stairs, to household fires, to child health to overdose from drugs.

The Center is also working to translate research into policy, and has many unique approaches worth hearing about. The Center is uniquely poised to do this as it’s a hub of interdisciplinary efforts combining research, policy, and practice all at the same place.

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